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You are here: /main/research expeditions/June-July 2006/Photo Gallery_5

Photo Gallery

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Day 24: Initial REEF Survey Results on Kure Atoll and Pearl and Hermes Atoll

A chart of Kure Atoll with the thirteen REEF fish survey sites plotted.  Click on the chart to see a larger, high-resolution version.  Credit: NOAA

A chart of Kure Atoll with the thirteen REEF fish survey sites plotted. Click on the chart to see a larger, high-resolution version. Credit: NOAA

 

A juvenile, endemic multiband or pebbled butterflyfish (<em>Chaetodon
          multicinctus</em>) has found the perfect home in this coral head.  Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior.  Photo:Claire Johnson/NOAA

A juvenile, endemic multiband or pebbled butterflyfish (Chaetodon multicinctus) has found the perfect home in this coral head. Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior. Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

 

The endemic blacktail or old woman wrasse, hinalea luahine (Thalassoma ballieui) was one of three species found on every single snorkel site in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

The endemic blacktail or old woman wrasse, hinalea luahine (Thalassoma ballieui) was one of three species found on every single snorkel site in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

 

The yellowstrip coris (Coris flavovittata) is another endemic species commonly found in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.  Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

The yellowstrip coris (Coris flavovittata) is another endemic species commonly found in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior.
Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

 

The Potter’s angelfish is an endemic species commonly found in the main Hawaiian Islands, yet only found on a handful of the REEF fish survey sites in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.  Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

The Potter’s angelfish is an endemic species commonly found in the main Hawaiian Islands, yet only found on a handful of the REEF fish survey sites in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior.
Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

 

This colorful fish called a spectacled parrotfish or uhu ‘ahu’ula (Scarus perspicillatus) is also an endemic species that was one of the top ten most commonly seen species in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

This colorful fish called a spectacled parrotfish or uhu ‘ahu’ula (Scarus perspicillatus) is also an endemic species that was one of the top ten most commonly seen species in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.
Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

 

Day 24: Spinner Dolphins in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

 

Majestic Hawaiian spinner dolphins in the clear lagoon waters of Kure Atoll, State Wildlife Refuge.  Photo: James Watt

Majestic Hawaiian spinner dolphins in the clear lagoon waters of Kure Atoll, State Wildlife Refuge.
Photo: James Watt

 

Cynthia Vanderlip and her team conduct spinner dolphin surveys in the lagoon around Green Island at Kure Atoll.  Photo: Dena Deck

Cynthia Vanderlip and her team conduct spinner dolphin surveys in the lagoon around Green Island at Kure Atoll.
Photo: Dena Deck

 

Spinner dolphins in the lagoon around Green Island at Kure Atoll, State Wildlife Refuge.  Photo: Patricia Greene

Spinner dolphins in the lagoon around Green Island at Kure Atoll, State Wildlife Refuge.
Photo: Patricia Greene

 

Day 25: Coral Predators of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

The shortbodied blenny (Exallias brevis) is an obligate corallivore, which feeds on coral.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

The shortbodied blenny (Exallias brevis) is an obligate corallivore, which feeds on coral.
Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

 

The crown of thorns (Acanthaster planci) is a major predator of coral reefs.  Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

The crown of thorns (Acanthaster planci) is a major predator of coral reefs. Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior.
Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

The ornate butterflyfish (Chaetodon ornatissimus) is one type of butterflyfish that is also a coral predator.  Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

The ornate butterflyfish (Chaetodon ornatissimus) is one type of butterflyfish that is also a coral predator. Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior.
Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

 

Day 26: Hawaiian Green Sea Turtles

 

A large green sea turtle basking in the sand. Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of Interior. Photo: Patricia Greene

 

Three endangered Hawaiian green sea turtles bask on Southeast Island in the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge.  Photo: Paulo Maurin

Three endangered Hawaiian green sea turtles bask on Southeast Island in the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Photo: Paulo Maurin

 

A curious Hawaiian green sea turtle approaches underwater at Puako in the main Hawaiian Islands.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

A curious Hawaiian green sea turtle approaches underwater at Puako in the main Hawaiian Islands. Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

Day 26: A Comb in the Pacific - Marine Debris Collection in the NWHI

 

A floating fishing net found at Pearl & Hermes Atoll in the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge and NWHI Marine National Monument, stuck on top of a large coral colony.  Photo: Paulo Maurin

A floating fishing net found at Pearl & Hermes Atoll in the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge and NWHI Marine National Monument, stuck on top of a large coral colony. Photo: Paulo Maurin

Plastic marine debris from afar floated to Green Island, Kure Atoll, littering this remote island.  Photo: Paulo Maurin

Plastic marine debris from afar floated to Green Island, Kure Atoll, littering this remote island. Photo: Paulo Maurin

A season’s worth of nets, recovered by the Marine Debris Project. Credit: NOAA Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

A season’s worth of nets, recovered by the Marine Debris Project. Credit: NOAA Coral Reef Ecosystem Division


Map of the North Pacific, showing the subtropical convergence zone as lines crossing its middle, taking on February 2003. The Northwestern Hawaiian Islands are on its path.  Credit: NOAA Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

Map of the North Pacific, showing the subtropical convergence zone as lines crossing its middle, taking on February 2003. The Northwestern Hawaiian Islands are on its path. Credit: NOAA Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

Day 27: Tips and Rays – Elasmobranchs at Pearl & Hermes Atoll

Paulo checking the shark hole, head first in the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Photo: Ellyn Tong

The backview of a white tip shark, showing some curiosity towards us. Photo: Paulo Maurin

Three Eagle Rays can be seen at the “toilet bowl” off Southeast Island Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, with their wings coming out of the water. Photo: Paulo Maurin

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