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You are here: /main/research expeditions/June-July 2006/Photo Gallery_4

Photo Gallery

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Day 17: Researching the Hawaiian Monk Seal on Kure

A young monk seal pup recently weaned.  Photo: James Watt

A young monk seal pup recently weaned. Photo: James Watt

 

Tracy Wurth and Antonette Gutierrez from NOAA Fisheries conduct atoll counts to get a “snapshot” of the monk seal population at Kure Atoll.  Photo: Patricia Greene

Tracy Wurth and Antonette Gutierrez from NOAA Fisheries conduct atoll counts to get a “snapshot” of the monk seal population at Kure Atoll.
Photo: Patricia Greene

 

Monk seal biologist, Tracy Wurth, discusses the importance of seal scat with the educators.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

Monk seal biologist, Tracy Wurth, discusses the importance of seal scat with the educators.
Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

 

Day 18: The Kahala as an `Aumakua?

 

The kahala, or amberjack, making a close appearance. Photo: Paulo Maurin

The kahala, or amberjack, making a close appearance.
Photo: Paulo Maurin

A close up of the kahala, with the black line visible. Photo: Paulo Maurin

A close up of the kahala, with the black line visible.
Photo: Paulo Maurin

 

A “sunbow,” a rainbow without the rain, was the show of the night.  Note the large arc of light around the sun. Photo: Paulo Maurin

A “sunbow,” a rainbow without the rain, was the show of the night. Note the large arc of light around the sun.
Photo: Paulo Maurin

 

At the end of the sunset, the last part of the sunset became a single ray of light shining straight up from the sun. Photo: Paulo Maurin

At the end of the sunset, the last part of the sunset became a single ray of light shining straight up from the sun.
Photo: Paulo Maurin

Day 21: Painting the Seafloor: Why and How We Map

 

A bathymetry map showing a 15-meter drop off from several angles. Colors indicate relative depth. Photo: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

A bathymetry map showing a 15-meter drop off from several angles. Colors indicate relative depth. Photo: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

 

Looking out a window at 45 meters (150 feet) underwater, everything inside the submarine turns blue.  Photo: Paulo Maurin

Looking out a window at 45 meters (150 feet) underwater, everything inside the submarine turns blue.
Photo: Paulo Maurin

 

A recently completed bathymetry map superimposed with satellite imagery of Kure atoll. Red indicates lowest depth, and blue deepest. Satellite image has white around edge indicating the exposed reef ring. Photo: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

A recently completed bathymetry map superimposed with satellite imagery of Kure atoll. Red indicates lowest depth, and blue deepest. Satellite image has white around edge indicating the exposed reef ring.
Photo: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

 

The research vessel Ahi operating in Kure atoll. Note the AC cabin to operate the computer equipment required for the sonar.  Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

The research vessel Ahi operating in Kure atoll. Note the AC cabin to operate the computer equipment required for the sonar.
Photo: Claire Johnson/NOAA

 

A NOAA ship using the sonar system.  Photo: NOAA

A NOAA ship using the sonar system. Photo: NOAA

 

Day 22: The Dunnottar Castle – a brand new discovery on the NWHI

 

Large metal structures, showing the inside of the bottom hull section of the ship. Photo: Paulo Maurin

Large metal structures, showing the inside of the bottom hull section of the ship.
Photo: Paulo Maurin

 

Another large section of the Dunnottar Castle, now home to a lively marine ecosystem. Photo: Paulo Maurin

Another large section of the Dunnottar Castle, now home to a lively marine ecosystem.
Photo: Paulo Maurin

 

Standing upright on one of its flukes, the anchor of the Dunnottar Castle seems to have been carefully positioned on the seafloor. Photo: Paolo Marin.

Standing upright on one of its flukes, the anchor of the Dunnottar Castle seems to have been carefully positioned on the seafloor. Photo: Paolo Maurin.

Dolphins from the large Kure Atoll pod. Photo: Paulo Maurin

Dolphins from the large Kure Atoll pod.
Photo: Paulo Maurin

 

Day 22: The Rosetta Stone of Mapping

A diver armed with a camera is towed from a boat, obtaining many pictures that will be used to groundtruth mapping data. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

 

Image from a previous expedition used to “ground-truth” backscatter map, showing a hard-substrate of coral cover, appearing as a darkened area in the map. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

Image from a previous expedition used to “ground-truth” backscatter map, showing a hard-substrate of coral cover, appearing as a darkened area in the map. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

A diver armed with a camera is towed from a boat, obtaining many pictures that will be used to groundtruth mapping data. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

A diver armed with a camera is towed from a boat, obtaining many pictures that will be used to groundtruth mapping data. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

 

A backscatter map, indicating substrate characteristics. Dark areas represent a harder seafloor, while lighter areas are indicative of a soft, sandy bottom. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

A backscatter map, indicating substrate characteristics. Dark areas represent a harder seafloor, while lighter areas are indicative of a soft, sandy bottom. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

A map integrating backscatter map with bathymetry, showing the seafloor in rich detail. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

A map integrating backscatter map with bathymetry, showing the seafloor in rich detail.
Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

Backscatter showing on top, each of the blue dots shown across represent points were image data was taken to ground-truth the backscatter map. Red dots have the image showing below it, and the topography profile at the bottom. Note how images show first a mix of hard and soft substrate, a sandy bottom, and a hard substrate, each shown on backscatter as gray, light, and dark areas, respectively. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

Backscatter showing on top, each of the blue dots shown across represent points were image data was taken to ground-truth the backscatter map. Red dots have the image showing below it, and the topography profile at the bottom. Note how images show first a mix of hard and soft substrate, a sandy bottom, and a hard substrate, each shown on backscatter as gray, light, and dark areas, respectively.
Credit: NOAA Fisheries Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

Day 24: A History of Man’s Impact and Exploitation; the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

Old fishing nets get piled up on the pier on Green Island at Kure Atoll waiting for the marine debris crew to pick up.  Photo: Patricia Greene.

Old fishing nets get piled up on the pier on Green Island at Kure Atoll waiting for the marine debris crew to pick up.
Photo: Patricia Greene

An old Coast Guard anchor sits deep within the Verbesina, a bright yellow flowering plant in the sunflower family that is an exotic, invasive plant on many of the atolls.  Photo: Patricia Greene.

An old Coast Guard anchor sits deep within the Verbesina, a bright yellow flowering plant in the sunflower family that is an exotic, invasive plant on many of the atolls. Photo: Patricia Greene

 

The remoteness of the area does not protect the islands from the prevailing ocean currents and man’s trash.  Photo: Patricia Greene.

The remoteness of the area does not protect the islands from the prevailing ocean currents and man’s trash.
Photo: Patricia Greene.

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